Spurgeon on the Meaning of the Cross

The whole of the tremendous debt was put upon his shoulders; the whole weight of the sins of all his people was placed upon him. Once he seemed to stagger under it: “Father, if it be possible.” But again he stood upright: “Nevertheless, not my will, but thine be done.” The whole of the punishment of his people was distilled into one cup; no mortal lip might give it so much as a solitary sip. When he put it to his own lips, it was so bitter, he well nigh spurned it—”Let this cup pass from me.” But his love for his people was so strong, that he took the cup in both his hands, and

“At one tremendous draught of love
He drank damnation dry,”

for all his people. He drank it all, he endured all, he suffered all; so that now for ever there are no flames of hell for them, no racks of torment; they have no eternal woes; Christ hath suffered all they ought to have suffered, and they must, they shall go free. The work was completely done by himself, without a helper.

-“Justification by Grace,” delivered on April 5, 1857, by Charles Haddon Spurgeon

3 Responses to Spurgeon on the Meaning of the Cross

  1. yankeegospelgirl April 22, 2011 at 11:29 am #

    AMEN!

  2. donsands April 22, 2011 at 2:07 pm #

    The prince of preachers has no shallowness in his words, does he.
    Thanks.

    There’s a song by Steven Curtis Chapman that says: “Believe the unbelievable, receive the inconceivable.”

    Christ forgives us fully, and completely, and we need not fear God’s wrath. Surely we will be disciplined at times by our loving Father, but no longer rebels and enemies are we, but sons.
    have a terrific Easter Sunday.

  3. John L April 23, 2011 at 1:12 am #

    “At one tremendous draught of love
    He drank damnation dry,”

    Spurgeon sure does have a way with words!

Comment here. Please use FIRST and LAST name.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes