New Orleans: Then and Now

I was struck this morning when NBC’s Today Show offered glowing and nostalgic remembrances of how great New Orleans was before the hurricane. The parties, the good times, the food, and the music. According to the Today Show’s reporting, New Orleans was a virtual heaven on earth—a true American original.

I have to say, however, that as a native Louisianan, I don’t think that description of pre-hurricane New Orleans really rings true. Yes, it is true that the city had its charms, but it also had its challenges, the kinds of challenges that are routinely overlooked by reveling tourists.

I could relate story after story about how difficult the city really was before Katrina. I could tell you about how my friend Dr. Charlie Draper’s wife got caught in the crossfire of a shoot-out while pumping gas into her car across the street from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. I could tell you about my former associate pastor who barely escaped being accosted by a group of homosexual men. Or I could tell you about my wife’s cousin who was shot to death by hoodlums who wanted to steal his walkman.

But these anecdotes do not comprise the sole reason for my impression of the city. It is a matter of public record that the city had a crime rate that was ten-times the national average. All of this is just an indicator of underlying problems that the outsider usually doesn’t notice.

Nicole Gelinas summed it up today in a penetrating essay titled “Will New Orleans Recover? Weak and struggling before Katrina, the good-time city now teeters on the brink.” She writes,

The truth is that even on a normal day, New Orleans is a sad city. Sure, tourists think New Orleans is fun: you can drink and hop from strip club to strip club all night on Bourbon Street, and gamble all your money away at Harrah’s. But the city’s decline over the past three decades has left it impoverished and lacking the resources to build its economy from within. New Orleans can’t take care of itself even when it is not 80 percent underwater; what is it going to do now, as waters continue to cripple it, and thousands of looters systematically destroy what Katrina left unscathed? . . .

The city’s government has long suffered from incompetence and corruption. Just weeks before Katrina, federal officials indicted associates of the former mayor, Marc Morial, for alleged kickbacks and contract fraud. Morial did nothing to attract diversified private investment to his impoverished city during the greatest economic boom of the modern era. . .

New Orleans teems with crime, and the NOPD can’t keep order on a good day. Former commissioner Richard Pennington brought New Orleans’ crime rate down from its peak during the mid-1990s. But since Pennington’s departure, crime rates have soared, to ten times the national average. The NOPD might have hundreds of decent officers, but it has a well-deserved institutional image as corrupt, brutal, and incompetent.

How will New Orleans’ economy recover from Katrina? Apart from some pass-through oil infrastructure, the city’s economy is utterly dependent on tourism. After the city’s mainstay oil industry decamped to Texas nearly a generation ago, New Orleans didn’t do the difficult work of cutting crime, educating illiterate citizens, and attracting new industries to the city. New Orleans became merely a convention and tourism economy, selling itself to visitors to survive, and over time it has only increased its economic dependence on outsiders. The fateful error of that strategy will become clearer in the next few months. . .

New Orleans has experienced a steady brain drain and fiscal drain for decades, as affluent corporations and individuals have fled, leaving behind a large population of people dependent on the government. Socially, New Orleans is one of America’s last helpless cities—just at the moment when it must do all it can to help itself survive.

9 Responses to New Orleans: Then and Now

  1. Barry Joslin September 2, 2005 at 7:55 am #

    Denny, great blog. Gelinas is right in her excellent essay in City Journal. At times like this the best side of NO is what folks are portraying, but it has its many dark and dangerous sides. It will be interesting to see if it can be rebuilt.

    Barry Joslin

  2. Jason Owens September 2, 2005 at 11:11 am #

    My main question is how long will it be before Michael Moore makes a documentary blaming President Bush for the hurricane.

  3. AlexF September 2, 2005 at 4:46 pm #

    Very interesting stuff. Great post.

  4. Jen Strange September 2, 2005 at 9:45 pm #

    We always like to remember “what was” so prettily, even if the truth was murder and mayhem. Thanks for the solemn reminder, Denny.

    At the risk of making to simple of a comparison. . . we are like Lot evacuating only a little ways to Zoar, or like his wife glimpsing so longingly back on a decrepit city that would have had her houseguests sodomized and her daughters given up to gang rape even by her own husband. Let’s not remember such stuff fondly.

  5. Anonymous September 6, 2005 at 2:00 pm #

    This event was the fault of the whiteman’s weather machine. Funded by Halliburton, this machine targets poor and impoverished neighborhoods in the hope of rebuilding luxury condos in their place.

  6. Todd November 18, 2005 at 10:35 am #

    Denny… you may or may not remember me from way back in your La Tech RA days in Pearce. Regardless… Joel Parker sent me the link to your blog, and this particular entry is a solid one. I hope all is well… and I will continue to check out your musings and such.

  7. Hardy November 18, 2005 at 11:14 am #

    Great blog, but an even better “ollie.”

  8. Denny Burk November 19, 2005 at 7:13 am #

    Todd,

    What’s your last name? E-mail me if you don’t want to write it here.

    Luf,
    Denny

  9. Todd Richards November 21, 2005 at 3:28 pm #

    My bad… I guess that would be useful information in trying to make a connection… Todd Richards.

Comment here. Please use FIRST and LAST name.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes