Being a Fruitful Pastor without Being a Plenary Speaker

Brian Croft has some words of wisdom about being a fruitful pastor without being a plenary speaker. He writes:

“Can a pastor still be fruitful if he has not spoken at a large conference?

“This might appear to be a strange question, but you would be surprised at the amount of pastors asking it. Do not misunderstand, I could not be more excited about these historic movements such as The Gospel Coalition, Together for the Gospel, and others like it. Much significant work for the kingdom is being done by those who lead them. Nevertheless, a down side to these movements is an insecurity that can develop in many ordinary pastors who feel their gifts are far less than those speaking at these premiere conferences and it ultimately leads to a questioning of their own effectiveness as a pastor. . .

“Dear brothers, God does not need those with extraordinary gifts. They exist as a gift to us to encourage and spur us on in the trenches of pastoral ministry. Attend these excellent conferences. Listen and learn. Be fed by the Word these gifted men preach for your benefit. Yet, do not envy them. Do not allow their unique gifts to make you question that God has gifted you to do the precise work He desires to be done in the exact place you find yourself pastoring today.”

Read the rest here.

4 Responses to Being a Fruitful Pastor without Being a Plenary Speaker

  1. Alex Humphrey May 17, 2011 at 6:56 pm #

    Wow, that is some serious encouragement! Jon Acuff of jonacuff.com had a similar response. I think it’s also important to remember that the pastors preaching are not only gifted, but also seasoned veterans. They are men who have been honing their craft for decades. Add the work of the Holy Spirit and it can sometimes be difficult not to feel overshadowed.

    But, as Brian said, we must remember that God uses us all. And especially to the young and restless, that God does everything in process.

  2. Stuart May 17, 2011 at 7:52 pm #

    What a great article.
    But to this, “Nevertheless, a down side to these movements is an insecurity that can develop in many ordinary pastors who feel their gifts are far less than those speaking at these premiere conferences and it ultimately leads to a questioning of their own effectiveness as a pastor”, we should probably add, “Nevertheless, a down side to these movements is an insecurity that can develop in many ordinary pastors who feel their gifts are equal to or greater than those speaking at these premiere conferences and it ultimately leads to discontentment, frustration, jealously, and feelings or irrelevancy.”

    Just sayin’.

  3. Charlie May 17, 2011 at 8:32 pm #

    Great words from Brian Croft! Thanks for posting them Dr. Burk.

  4. Bryan May 19, 2011 at 4:09 pm #

    Great article and very encouraging. Yet many lay people are not content with “ordinary” pastors they want the “celebrity guy” which causes “ordinary guys” to constantly question and doubt.
    The celebrity crazed culture we live in has seeped into the church – sadly it seems using (abusing) the coat tails of some very good, God-honoring conferences.

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