Evangelicals and the Homosexual Revolution

Albert Mohler’s article for The Washington Post is a must-read. It’s a sobering reflection on where evangelicals stand within a culture that has turned against a biblical view of human sexuality. He writes:

Evangelicals cannot join the moral revolution on homosexuality, but it seems unlikely that we can stop it, either. The issue of homosexuality, by itself and in tandem with other moral issues, may well lead to the marginalization of evangelical Christians within the larger society. This is already the case in secular Europe and, increasingly, in Great Britain and Canada as well. Churches and other groups that cannot accept the full normalization of same-sex relationships will find themselves driven further and further from the cultural mainstream.

This is going to be particularly difficult for America’s evangelical Christians. We are accustomed to standing within the political and cultural mainstream, comfortable in an America that shared much of our moral worldview. Those days are over.

Mohler’s article ends on a hopeful note, saying that we can still be faithful to the gospel even if we are marginalized. That is a good word for what is sure to be some hard days ahead. Read the rest here.

47 Responses to Evangelicals and the Homosexual Revolution

  1. David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 12:36 am #

    A few years ago I went to Havana to teach theology (I had a letter from the Dept of the Treasury, so I was kosher). My class of nearly 30 students was the most brilliant, dedicated, sacrificial, and spiritually vital of any group I had taught in all of Latin America, and that’s saying something. I noted one couple sitting near the back of the class was especially joyful, engaged, and responsive to the Word of God. It turns out the man was a pastor who had only recently been released from jail where he had been beaten and held without charges until finally released; his crime was he called the police to complain that thugs were harassing his (legally approved) Bible study.

    Near the end of the week I had the privilege of celebrating communion with these saints of God. As we broke bread and read the Scriptures, I was overwhelmed. These people honored me to lead them, but I could not stand in their shadow. Some had spent $100 to come to Havana from their homes near Guantanamo Bay—the equivalent of FIVE MONTHS’ government salary. But they fairly glowed with God’s glory in the midst of their sacrifice and suffering. That celebration of the Lord’s Supper was the most intense celebration that I had ever had to that point, or since; it was typical for them.

    It struck me, walking later through the sites of downtown Havana with my host, why I felt that way. Persecution, suffering, sacrifice, and marginalization are the very DNA of Christianity. Golgotha is Ground Zero for who we are. The farther we get from the foot of the Cross, the more we struggle to be true to who Jesus is, and (to speak like C.S. Lewis), the less like “ourselves” we become. But the more we are treated as Jesus was in His final hours, the more His character and power is released in us, and more we are made legitimate heirs of the power of the resurrection. These Cuban Christians had drawn near the wounds of Christ, had received those wounds themselves, and therefore reflected His glory more completely and were more fully themselves. That isn’t melodrama, it was spiritual gravity.

    The marginalization that Dr. Mohler rightly speaks of is not something strange or surprising (1 Peter 4:12) and is not unexpected if we pay attention to Jesus (John 15:18-20). It is what the Apostle Paul prayed for (Philippians 3:10-11) , and certainly what we have been granted as disciples of Christ as an honor and a gift (Philippians 1:29-30). It is also how we will finally display our Lord’s glory and overcome (Revelation 12:11). No one /relishes/ the idea of suffering. Even Jesus didn’t. But if we want Christ’s power to rest upon us—as must surely be the thirst of every true Christian—we will joyfully submit to it as part of God’s providential plan. There will be the Neros out there that think we have lost our power and influence because of this cultural shift. God grant that we don’t make the mistake of feeling that way.
    What blessed times we live in by His grace.

    Honored to suffer with the likes of you, Denny.

    Maranatha.

    • Denny Burk February 10, 2013 at 1:29 am #

      Thanks, Dave. That’s a great word, brother!

  2. Robert I Masters February 10, 2013 at 4:05 pm #

    I am sorry but this defeatist eschatology is what led the Lutheran Church in Germany to hand the power over to Hitler.
    I disagree that there is nothing we can do about this…work to change the law.
    We are winning in multiple fronts. The Cultural Mandate has never been rescinded and those who are obedient in the Twin Mandates of Scripture can expect Gods richest blessing.
    To obey is better than sacrifice. Pietism is killing this country …and others.

    • buddyglass February 10, 2013 at 8:02 pm #

      Out of curiosity, what would your vision of “winning” look like?

      • David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 9:00 pm #

        I was going to ask the same thing, Buddy, but you beat me to it.

        • Robert I Masters February 10, 2013 at 10:06 pm #

          Buddyglass and David Thomas,
          I think this video sums up what a vision of winning would like as I understand the Bible.

          http://tinyurl.com/bfxvo46

          I do not have a Prophecy Chart for you though!!!!!!

          It is Faith for all of life.

          Two practical examples of how this is working out in the State where I reside.Tennessee.
          1. Christians and Conservatives have implemented laws that prevent Homosexuals from being defined as a special class with special status.

          2.The Gun encouragement lobby here and across the nation.
          Tenn is on the forefront in keeping its citizens safe and free.
          Legislators who fail to uphold our 2nd Amendment rights are fired.
          Laws like guns in trunks at work lead the way in allowing for a safer and more secure Tenn.

          • David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 11:15 pm #

            Robert, I am glad that the Battles of Tours and Vienna were won. I am glad for the soaring cathedrals and the literature of Western civilization. I am glad for my European heritage and the orderly effect the Christian worldview has had upon the world. But Christianity as a cultural force is not so powerful as a single Christian truly being like Christ.

            I believe the video you linked to presents a false choice. The false choice is grounded in the presuppositions that,

            A) Preserving and promoting human civilization is primary to the mission of the Church, and (by corollary)

            B) The previous point is effected by the political process.

            The faith expressed and taught by the New Testament is fundamentally radical and apocalyptic. Quite frankly, it doesn’t remotely address raising up and sustaining countries like the United States, or Europe before it, or Byzantium before that, or Christian North Africa before that. On the contrary, it is grounded in the theology of the Book of Daniel, viz., that all earthly kingdoms shall fall. Not only Revelation, but all the books of the New Testament tell us that Christ followers shall rise victorious even as Christ did–raised up from the earth on a cross, He draws all men unto Himself.

            Was the cross a defeat? In truth, it was an unmitigated disaster of the first order. But therein lies the paradox: It was also the enthronement of the Son of God and the beginning of the end for the Enemy of our souls. Through it came resurrection power, New Covenant, and Holy Spirit Baptism. Christians win by losing as the world considers losing.

            I’m all about just laws. But its easy to talk that way in Tennessee (with all due respect; I love Tennessee). What of Washington State, where I reside, where legalized pot and gay marriage just passed? I must witness in a different way–and I daresay the New Testament is a better guide for me in my situation than it is for those pushing political triumphalism.

            The choice isn’t, “Impose or be imposed upon.” Jesus chose a third route: Surrender yourself, pick up your cross, and be crucified. In so doing He neither coerced, nor was He coerced.

            We are called to that same path. At least that’s how I read it.

            • Robert I Masters February 11, 2013 at 12:51 am #

              But Christianity as a cultural force is not so powerful as a single Christian truly being like Christ.

              I did say in post the Twin Mandates of Scripture. The Cultural Mandate and the Great Comission. Its the twin train tracks of the Bible. Cultural mandate with the Gospel leads to the Social gospel and Gospel without the culture leads to evasive pietism(Herman Bavinck). You can win a a few stragglers to faith in Christ but if you lose the culture then you lose the soul of a nation. This is why I usually do not refer to myself as a evangelical.

              The faith expressed and taught by the New Testament is fundamentally radical and apocalyptic. Quite frankly, it doesn’t remotely address raising up and sustaining countries like the United States, or Europe before it, or Byzantium before that, or Christian North Africa before that. On the contrary, it is grounded in the theology of the Book of Daniel, viz., that all earthly kingdoms shall fall. Not only Revelation, but all the books of the New Testament tell us that Christ followers shall rise victorious even as Christ did–raised up from the earth on a cross, He draws all men unto Himself.

              First of all why the emphasis on the New Testament it is the whole word of God. Convenient to leave out the civil and ceremonial law!
              Secondly I suspect we just do not see the Eschatological aspects of the Bible the same.

              Was the cross a defeat? In truth, it was an unmitigated disaster of the first order. But therein lies the paradox: It was also the enthronement of the Son of God and the beginning of the end for the Enemy of our souls. Through it came resurrection power, New Covenant, and Holy Spirit Baptism. Christians win by losing as the world considers losing.

              This is the power of the Gospel-Amen
              But it is only one track of the train. The whole counsel of God demands Culture and Gospel.

              I’m all about just laws. But its easy to talk that way in Tennessee (with all due respect; I love Tennessee). What of Washington State, where I reside, where legalized pot and gay marriage just passed? I must witness in a different way–and I daresay the New Testament is a better guide for me in my situation than it is for those pushing political triumphalism.

              Here I am not only arguing for for political activisim but family government, economic government, and a whole host of spheres of infleunce. Is your Church calling your members to dominion in the medical field , the sports arena, the music arena.the tech arena.Even though your city might not be “a Geneva ” yet it is one person , one county , one state at a time. I like what Ken Hutcherson was doing in your state.This is what Thomas Chalmers did in Scotland.

              The choice isn’t, “Impose or be imposed upon.” Jesus chose a third route: Surrender yourself, pick up your cross, and be crucified. In so doing He neither coerced, nor was He coerced.

              We are called to that same path. At least that’s how I read it.

              This is a point where a totally disagree with you.

              1.Rc Sproul says this about worldview. There is only two; you either follow Christ and His commandments or Satan and his command. Another way of saying impose or be imposed upon.

              2. Christ and His mission is not the same as the Christians mission. We are not called to be saviours of the world. We are not little Jesus.s. We are to proclaim Christ exalted.

              3. Surrendering to Christ does not exclude Servanthood Dominion.

              I used to live in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and Dr Kennedy was a huge influence on my thinking in this arena. I still appreciate his yeomans work in both the Cultural Arena and the Gospel Arena through the Reclaiming America conference and EE
              One of the last conferences I attended a tape was given out entitled “Will the Church Forget”. He made a bold statement that I believe is true and Biblical. If the Church refuses to obey the Cultural Mandate given by the Lord in Gen 1: 28 then the Culture will go to hell in a handbasket.

              Maybe thats why Washington is going too hell in a handbasket.!

              • Robert I Masters February 11, 2013 at 12:54 am #

                Should be culural mandate WITHOUT the Gospel.

              • David Thomas February 11, 2013 at 2:14 am #

                Robert, what you are doing is applying a Dominionist hermeneutic of Scripture in order that it would justify…a Dominionist hermeneutic of Scripture. That is the /true/ meaning behind “begging the question.”

                I reject Dominionism for more reasons than I care to express in this blog, because it would take over the entire discussion and frankly I haven’t the time for it.

                As for the matters at hand, I do accept the Cultural Mandate, but I reject your interpretation of how we should pursue it, including the “dual track” metaphor. In my view, the Great Commission is a track laid /atop/ the Cultural Mandate, so that what the Church does is all one: WITNESS.

                Whatever theology we adopt must apply itself with equal effectiveness across time and space to all contexts. The good old US of A is, when all is said and done, a sideshow and an anomaly. The greatest weakness of Dominionism is that is requires far too many antecedents, too many prerequisites. And I’ve seen some excellent Dominionists that had become as coercsive as any politician, while also observing impoverished, weak, and politically impotent Christians elsewhere in the world shine like the stars in the heavens as the Spirit of glory and of God rested upon them.

                No one likes incarnation and crucifixion. But if Jesus did it that way, I’ll have a hard time arguing that it can be improved upon.

                We’ll just have to agree to disagree. If you’re right, I’ll be right there with you in the parade. If I’m right, we can hold each other’s hands in prayer in prison.

  3. Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 5:13 pm #

    To have Al Mohler and others consistantly show up with ties that closely resemble the pattern and colors of the Confederate Battle Flag is preposterous – more so when you consider the SBC has a black president and almost all blacks are offended by this flag or any symbol of that culture which includes neo-nazsis , white supremicist groups all of which advocate Hate as well as crimes against homosexuals . Mohler is smart enough to understand this connection but stubborn enough to continue asserting himself as a leader among the Calvinist aka SGM which we all don’t know when he switches horses . His opinions are O.K. ,but, he can eat his hat /or excuse me , his tie . As usual he has no workable solutions . Maybe he should call Windemeyer for a chat – Cathy did and didn’t die .

    • James Stanton February 10, 2013 at 6:03 pm #

      I think for many the symbolism of confederate colors has shifted from support of the antebellum era to support of a modern states rights constitutional conservatism. To give in to the sensibilities of some minority group would be giving in to this cult of political correctness that has swept the country.

      In all seriousness, I doubt there’s much to it.

      • buddyglass February 10, 2013 at 7:59 pm #

        God forbid we conduct ourselves differently in even a small way to avoid antagonizing certain of our Christian brethren.

        • James Stanton February 10, 2013 at 8:31 pm #

          I suppose the snark in my comment was a little too subtle but I thought the next line would have cleared it up.

          • buddyglass February 10, 2013 at 9:20 pm #

            My snark meter is apparently broken. But yeah, I agree Mohler’s tie choice is almost surely not significant. Based on what we can see in that picture it’s not even clear what the pattern is. All you can see is red, white and blue.

            • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 10:28 pm #

              No , All You Can See is Red , White and Blue . A blind personcan make out more than that !

    • David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 9:05 pm #

      I’m no friend of the Stars and Bars in modern parlance, but how in the world can a that photo evoke such a response? Not only are red, white, and blue American colors that are commonly found in conservative ties worn by men of all political “stripes,” but at glance at the logo of Southern Baptist Seminary (http://www.sbts.edu/) may also be enlightening.

      There’s enough real offense out there, folks, without inventing things to be offended by. If anyone thinks Al Mohler even remotely intended to allude to the Confederacy by his choice of neckwear, their imaginations need a tune up.

      • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 10:00 pm #

        David , Then you tell me where these certain guys buy these particular ties that are made in China . You can try your imagunation . This does not allude to the Confederacy but to the “You can’t tell us what we are going to do attitude ” . That attitude is out here folks – don’t need an imagination and as soon as we all play on the same team , the sooner SBC’s other problems will come inline . Are the Calvinists camping on the grass yet outside the President’s office .

        • David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 10:56 pm #

          Jack, it must be absolutely exhausting to be of your mindset.

          I feel for those who are so easily offended, who so quickly find that which is politically dark in the smallest of things. But my pity does not extend so far that I will, in turn, exhaust myself attempting to anticipate their hyperactive imaginations and so live as to never offend them. In today’s world that would be an exercise in futility anyway.

          • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 11:17 pm #

            David , I’m entertained by the way some believe they are making their “case” . You write beautifully but don’t say anything .

            • David Thomas February 10, 2013 at 11:19 pm #

              Jack, in all charity, you write poorly and don’t say anything.

              • Jack Wolford February 11, 2013 at 12:06 am #

                David , Thanks , I’ll take anything on the table .

                • David Thomas February 11, 2013 at 12:08 am #

                  Yes, I had, uh, gathered that from your penetrating exegesis of Dr. Mohler’s wardrobe…

      • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 11:40 pm #

        David , We’re not inventing things . People flying the Stars & Bars , Nazi symbols , white supremacy flags gravitate towards our churches for all the wrong reasons – anti-Obama . It’s O.K. to oppose President Obama but not for racial reasons . Before the election people were willing to suffer the “friendships” of these groups hoping for a win . That’s over now – My opinion is that God detests those groups , that thinking and asking His help while carrying on in this fashion is ludicrous (stupid) .

        • Akash Charles February 11, 2013 at 2:27 am #

          heaps of people voted for Obama on racial reasons too!!!- as a matter of fact currently it seems elections are won based on color rather than character

    • Stephen Beck February 10, 2013 at 11:25 pm #

      It appears the tie in the picture is the same as the one he wears on the coverpicture of his popular new book “Conviction to Lead” http://www.amazon.com/Conviction-Lead-The-Principles-Leadership/dp/0764210041 A quick google image search of “Al Mohler” reveals he wears many similar diagonally-striped ties of various colors. It’s a good look. Yet from an obscured picture of a red and blue tie, you conclude that Mohler is a Confederate supporter, implied he was a racist, neo-nazsi (sic), supremicist (sic), an advocate of Hate, a homophobe, stubborn, and that Calvinism and Sovereign Grace Ministries are the same.

      • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 11:51 pm #

        You’re trying to build a case of some kind . You’re all wet and you know it .. Try attacking someone else . But, since you brought it up , do you consider Calvinism or Soverign Grace Ministries the same as the Southern Baptist Convention’s Religion ?

  4. Robert I Masters February 10, 2013 at 5:59 pm #

    Jack Wolford,
    Can you please give one factual, reproduce-able bit of evidence that any evangelical is wrapping themselves in the Confederate flag. Al Mohler is NOT going to a John Brown on the Southern Poverty Law Center.

    • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 7:31 pm #

      Robert I Masters , Reading about the Southern Poverty Law Center , their knowledge , good works and support of individual rights is a good thing . Glad you brought them up . To not understand his / others regular wearing of that particular tie is stupid . Look at the tie – there for all to see is the “club” mentality – never mind whatever else they may or may not wrap themselves in for which you require additional “evidence” . Mind you , he , you and others have the right to sport anything you wish and feel good about it . He leads a religious denomination seminary and as such is supposed to be mindful of the feelings of others . He has some Rights he hasn’t yet used .

  5. Robert I Masters February 10, 2013 at 8:25 pm #

    Jack Wolford
    Oh You mean the Red, White, and Blue tie. Are not those the colors of the American Flag?
    BTW I HATE homosexuality too. The Bible commands us to HATE all evil.

    • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 9:24 pm #

      Robert I Masters , Yes , the exact Red , exact White & exact Blue tie in the dimensions of the Confederate Battle Flag . Have you seen one ? Do you know the flag of which I speak ? If homosexuality is NOT elected in 100% of the cases , but , is due to heredity – DNA – then no amount of getting drunk , no amount of boyfriends and an uncertain amount of time on their knees will rid a person of this condition . The medical people support this thinking with proper support therapy including proper – not stupid religious applications . Beating a dummy of your mother in the nude with a bat would be an example of stupid therapy religious or otherwise in my humble opinion . God doesn’t Hate that or them . He Hates ignorance only if it doesn’t look for Truth . The Truth is that their red , white & blue “clubbie ” flag looks like the Confederate Battle Flag – no stuff !! Rather than to try to defend that , it’s better to exercise some other God given Rights .

      • Akash Charles February 11, 2013 at 3:08 am #

        the same could be said for all sins!!!!

  6. Robert I Masters February 10, 2013 at 10:26 pm #

    Jack
    Conspiracy much!I think that if you think Albert Mohler is a Confederate Supporter you are rather naive!
    Problem is that Scripture clearly delineates homosexuals as those whose eternal destiny is hell…yes among others and Thankfully God offers a way out of that lifestyle.. Praise God for His Gospel.

    • Jack Wolford February 10, 2013 at 10:52 pm #

      I didn’t say he was a Confederacy supporter as I don’t believe he would support a dead horse . These guys have something like a ring out of a cereal box for show and tell . It’s Stupid . You Define a homosexual if you can . Bible doesn’t use that word . Then see if You can command who will go to “hell”. Buy a magnifying glass and read a little more and a little closer .

  7. buddyglass February 11, 2013 at 1:54 am #

    How about Great Commission minus Cultural Mandate plus “love your neighbor as yourself” and “defend the needy and fatherless; grant justice to the oppressed”.

    • buddyglass February 11, 2013 at 1:56 am #

      This was supposed to go under Robert Master’s post.

    • Robert I Masters February 11, 2013 at 2:07 am #

      You want to cut out Gen 1:28 from the Bible.Ummm!!!!!!

      http://tinyurl.com/axv3zhs

      • David Thomas February 11, 2013 at 2:15 am #

        Robert, do you /really/ think you have a monopoly on that verse’s interpretation?

        • Akash Charles February 11, 2013 at 3:11 am #

          and this is precisely why so many people are turned off from Christianity, because if you do not like a part of the bible you can just “Interpret it differently”

          and it is a fair point-why put faith in a God that can supposedly mean different things!!

  8. Robert I Masters February 11, 2013 at 3:09 am #

    David Thomas
    I am still waiting to hear why the thrones of Reformed people are wrong.
    Why is the Gospel Project writer wrong in his interpetation..Halim Suh.?
    Why is RC Sproul Jr wrong?
    Why is Douglas Wilson Wrong ?
    Why was Chuck Colson wrong ?
    Why was DJ Kennedy wrong?
    Why is Jerry Sutton Wrong?I heard that one and still have copy of that sermon.
    Why is Tim Keller wrong?
    Why is Abraham Kuyper wrong?
    Shall I continue?

    • David Thomas February 11, 2013 at 3:11 am #

      My reply is awaiting moderation, Robert.

    • Akash Charles February 11, 2013 at 3:12 am #

      according to some people here all of these men are part of some secret plan to divide society!!!-to them all of them would be wrong

  9. Linda Jackson February 12, 2013 at 4:52 pm #

    Truth is, you all are just blaming the diminishing Christian Faith on Homosexuality, when in fact people are just becoming more aware that it is a Farce.

    • David Thomas February 12, 2013 at 6:04 pm #

      Hate to break it to you Linda, but you haven’t understood at all what Dr. Mohler or “we all” are saying in the slightest.

      For starters, the Christian Faith isn’t “diminishing” at all. Christianity is at a high water mark on a global scale, with more people in more places turning to Christ than ever before. It is true that Northern and Western Christianity no longer holds the global monopoly, but this result has been the labor of our churches, universities, and missionary sending agencies over over 200 years. We are THRILLED that Africa is more Christian than North America, and that Latin America and Asia are bursting with church growth and new believers. Never before has Christianity been so universal, so global, and so widely preached at a grassroots level. Or are you one of those people who think that white, well-heeled North Americans are the only ones that “count,” and that the English-speaking world is /really/ the only one that is?

      Second, Dr. Mohler hardly “blames” the decline of morality in our culture on homosexuality. It is a symptom, to be sure, or moral decline–but it is only one of many. We don’t blame homosexuality for American decline anymore than we blame the fruit that falls from a tree in our yard for the roots invading our drainage system.

      • Linda Jackson February 12, 2013 at 9:12 pm #

        I am quite the opposite, David. I have lived all over the world and have done many humanitarian projects, and, as a matter of fact, I can’t wait to get out of this uptight, frigid, soul-less place that has become America. True, many Afrikaan countries are Christian, however, they are not boring, obsessed, over-strung followers like the ones in this country. Truthfully, I would have more respect for American Christians if they weren’t so judgmental and hateful.

        • Akash CHarles February 13, 2013 at 6:46 am #

          nice to know that standing for ones beliefs is judgmental and hateful- now I wonder why we have so many weak leaders in society today!!

        • David Thomas February 13, 2013 at 2:34 pm #

          I appreciate that you have traveled the world, but I was responding to your remark about Christianity being in decline, when the global statistics say something quite different.

          I will grant that Christianity is in decline in the liberalized West (Europe, Canada, United States), but I would note the irony of our mutual observation of that decline AND the concomitant agreement that American culture has increasingly become (as you say) “uptight, frigid, soul-less.” Might the secularization of society lie at the root of the malaise you observe?

          No one will agree more quickly than the majority of American Christians that the Christianity that most Africans, Latins, and Asians practice is fiery and vibrant (certainly not “boring,” as you point out). But if you think for a minute that those Christians in other lands are the slightest bit tolerant of the sexually permissive lifestyle choices that Americans are making as a society, you need to do a bit more footwork. Huge numbers of American Anglicans, for instance, are submitting themselves the Nigerian Anglican bishops in an effort to find a fellowship the won’t knuckle under to the Zeitgeist of homosexual “tolerance.” And Ugandan bishops sent the American Episcopal Church (which had ordained a gay bishop) a letter rejecting their offer of financial aid in exchange for compromise on this issue, saying the gospel of Jesus Christ is not for sale at any price.

          For the record, I don’t hate homosexuals. I have seen the ravaging effects of that sin in the lives of people I love, so I disagree with it. But I would observe in turn that one of the most hateful, judgmental, and toxic remarks that can ever be made is to say that someone else’s moral stance is hatred simply because it does not conform to our own. I certainly hope you don’t think the Africans you speak so highly of are “haters” because they think homosexuality is a sin in conformity with Scriptures and church teachings that are thousands of years old. Certainly some people do hate in the name of religion. But I see many being branded as “hateful and judgmental” for doing nothing other than standing for what they believe.

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